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TEDxDelft 2016 | TEDxDelft Salon | My antidote against work stress

“13 {95388bbb2e9df0f2b3d26445fc24fe82185b1b567dbb094bc3a45074083d0a2b} of the Dutch workforce suffers from burnout symptoms,” Hidde de Vries said. In the United States it is around 53 {95388bbb2e9df0f2b3d26445fc24fe82185b1b567dbb094bc3a45074083d0a2b}. “Why have we not found a way yet to deal effectively with work stress?”

For most of his career De Vries has had strong ties with marketing and communication, beginning with obtaining his bachelor’s degree in this field. After attaining his diploma he became an account manager for a printing company, but after a couple of years he went back to the field of communication and public relations. His main focus was to help various brands garner more awareness, and even founded his own agency. He currently works for Google, and has founded a new company called 7 Day Recharge.

De Vries searched for the antidote after almost suffering from a burnout himself. His company had not managed to survive the economic crisis, and though he managed to close it without debt, he felt like he was indebted to himself. He found the antidote to be composed of three elements: “Energy, focus and happiness.”

“Use your energy to focus on one thing, something that makes you happy,” he said. De Vries tried various methods to help get more energy and stay better focussed through a combination of healthy nutrition, yoga and mindfulness. He settled on a series of good practices, healthy breakfast, regular breaks and no electronic appliances after 9 pm. By balancing these three elements and taking care of himself, he had more energy and better focus. Soon he found himself reinvigorated. “And I am still a workaholic.”

TEDxDelft 2016 | TEDxDelft Salon | Wallet power

“When I was a child, I listened to stories from a pastor who would visit our school each year to tell about the poor children in Suriname,” Karen Kammeraat said. “So I donated year after year, and still I kept seeing pictures of poor children.” So she decided something had to change.

Kammeraat studied at TU Delft, where she majored in Industrial Design Engineering. After finishing her studies she started out working for a company where she helped build a database containing rules and regulations for exporters and producers in developing countries. Her affinity with the developing world has only grown since then, working as a freelance consultant in Tanzania and for Oxfam Novib.

Kammeraat wanted to understand why poverty continued despite the large amount of charity. What she found was that there was a vicious cycle. The big corporations only paid a small amount to the actual producers, far too little for these producers to lead a decent life. “We have to change, because we live at the expense of others,” she explained. “I do not want to contribute to this anymore.”

Kammeraat decided to do research, to be more selective about what she spends her money on. “It is not easy to figure out exactly which companies pay a good price to producers.” Food and drink were the first products she focussed on, before moving on to clothes. “For clothing it was much more difficult to find out, as companies can be misleading.” Though it might seem like a tough task, Kammeraat is convinced change is possible. “By myself I will not be able to do much, but together we can make a difference.”

TEDxDelft 2016 | TEDxDelft Salon | Hidde de Vries

Hidde de VriesWith the advent of modern-day technology, work can appear to be even more pervasive. New e-mails which continuously pop up and mobile phones mean being constantly reachable for colleagues. Hidde de Vries, founder of 7 Day Recharge, thinks it is time to make the most out of life again.

De Vries earned a Bachelor’s degree in Marketing and Communication, before starting out as an account manager for a printing company. After a few years, he turned back to communications and public relations, helping brands grow further and eventually co-founding his marketing group. At present, he works for Google Netherlands, in addition to his work for 7 Day Recharge.

Dealing with modern-day business challenges is therefore something de Vries is very familiar with. It is an idea he came up with due to his own struggles. “It started with myself almost having a burnout several years ago,” he explains. De Vries is convinced his experience from this part of his life will help other people prevent it.

“It gives people an easy framework on how to increase their performance over time and to make the most of their lives,” he says. Through the programme he created it is his goal to help people find their balance again in life and at the same time optimize their productivity. It is an idea he is keen to share on the TEDxDelft stage.

Curious to hear how Hidde de Vries thinks he can help you make the most of your life? Then come join us for the next TEDxDelft salon on Sunday 20 March at Theater de Veste.

TEDxDelft 2016 | TEDxDelft Salon | Karen Kammeraat

Karen Kammeraat“At a certain point I was starting to wonder how it is possible that after donating money for so many years there still is poverty,” said Karen Kammeraat. For the freelance consultant, it was obvious that simply giving money to charity was not going to cut it.

Born in Vlissingen, Kammeraat enrolled at the Delft University of Technology where she studied Industrial Design Engineering. From there, she started working for a company where she helped work on a database with regards to regulations, standards and issues for exporters and producers in developing countries. From then on the rest of her career always had ties with the developing world, including a spell working in Tanzania as a freelance consultant as well as working for Oxfam Novib.

As part of her job Kammeraat is regularly in contact with local producers, thus gaining first-hand knowledge of the situation. This has also provided her with valuable insight into the effectiveness of charities and incentivized her to continue further research into the economic performance of developing countries. “I read a lot about international trade and found that for a large part the way we conduct trade with developing countries is unfair,” she said.

If money makes the world go round, then for Kammeraat, making sure that money is well spent becomes all the more important. Especially when the goal is to eradicate poverty. “Right now we buy a lot of products that are made by people who are exploited and not paid nor treated decently,” she explained. “By choosing wisely and responsibly how we spend our money we can make the world a better place.”

Interested to hear how Karen Kammeraat thinks we can all help fight poverty in developing countries? Then come join us Sunday 20 March for the next TEDxDelft salon at Theater de Veste.

TEDxDelft 2016 | TEDxDelft Salon | Universal man

TEDxDelft Events

On Sunday 20 March at 15:00 TEDxDelft will host its next Salon at Theater de Veste, entitled Universal Man. In anticipation of the main event which will celebrate the universal genius, the Salon’s theme will be an interesting teaser of what is to come: polymaths.

The event will be held in English and admission is free. Register here to participate at the upcoming event, and come join us for an interesting afternoon of exciting talks and entertainment.

Special thanks to:

Logos_SalonPartner_StudiumGenerale

 

Studium Generale

 

 

Theater de Veste Logo

 

 

Theater de Veste

 

 

 

Sponsors TIPPresentations

 

Talbott International Presentations

 

 

LEX-Co

 

LEX-Company

TEDxDelft 2016 | TEDxDelft Salon | Sustainable travel

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“When you think about sustainable travelling, the first thing you think of is the fuel consumption used to get to your destination,” Robert Mulder, architect says. “But what about the hotels?”

Architecture is not just Mulder’s career, it is a passion. He graduated from TU Delft’s civil engineering faculty with a major in architecture. He started out as an architectural draftsman, before further climbing the ladder, from architect to project architect. Eventually, he would become owner of his own agency, working on several prestigious projects.

Hotels contribute extensively to climate change. “Hotels are heated or cooled 24/7, which is unnecessary,” explains Mulder. Many measures have been taken, such as leaving towels on the floor, or the card that turns off all electricity when a guest leaves the room. But these measures make relatively little impact on the environment. Mulder argues that a more extensive rethinking is needed of what a sustainable hotel is.

By designing a new hotel from the ground up with sustainability and reusability in mind, the possibilities to minimise a hotel’s footprint become almost endless. By reusing water from the shower for the toilet, and then for greenhouses on the roof of the hotel, less water is being used. The greenhouse allows the hotel to grow its own fruits and vegetables, and the gases help to warm up the hotel. A system built into the facade further helps with regulating room temperature by allowing sunlight in or blocking it, depending on whether or not guests are in the room. By rethinking hotels and creating a more integrated system of use and reuse, Mulder is convinced hotels will have a big impact on the environment in the future.

TEDxDelft 2016 | TEDxDelft Salon | Harvest motion, eliminate batteries

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“We are going to have 20 billion low-powered devices by 2020,” Dr. Nima Tolou says. “Let me tell you about some of those 20 billion.”

In 2012 Tolou received his PhD from TU Delft’s Department of Biomechanical Engineering, dealing with micro-electro-mechanical systems. Since then, he has continued to focus on MEMS, publishing several research papers and submitting eight patents, seven of which he is named first inventor on. He currently works as Assistant Professor at the Department of Precision and Microsystems Engineering at TU Delft, as well as being an Intra-European fellow at Imperial College London.

“Every day 30,000 containers go through the port at Rotterdam,” Dr. Tolou explains. “All equipped with sensors to measure temperature, or report its location.” These small devices all use batteries. In some cases, it can even be crucial, for instance with pacemakers. These devices also use batteries, which have to be replaced occasionally. Together, all these used batteries could fill several Olympic stadiums.

Finding an alternative to batteries, therefore, would be tremendously beneficial to the environment. “Why not harvest energy from motion to power devices?” Dr. Tolou asks. By capturing kinetic energy, it can then be transferred to a device which can store and send it to the device whenever it requires energy. Until recently, however, energy harvesters only worked when under regular and even motion. “But now it is possible to build these harvesters that can work with random motion,” he announces. If used on a large-scale this could reduce the dependence on batteries, potentially leading to a battery-free environment.

TEDxDelft 2016 | TEDxDelft Salon | A wheel without a centre

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“Cars have changed a lot over the past 100 years,” Bas aan de Stegge explains. All except for the combustion engine.

Aan de Stegge started out as a mechanic for Formula Student Team Delft, working on the powertrain while studying for his Bachelor in Mechanical Engineering at TU Delft. He would later become part of the team’s Chief Recruiting Committee. In this role, he was charged with recruiting new engineers. Eventually, he would take on the role of Chief Executive Officer for the team, a role he continues to fulfill to this day.

A combustion engine accounts for a significant part of a car in terms of weight. In addition, it is a major cause of greenhouse gas emissions. Many elements of the car have evolved throughout the years, but the combustion engine has not. In recent years the number of electric cars has risen, but they still use concepts from cars as they have been built throughout the years. At Formula Student Team Delft, they decided to take up the challenge to develop a completely new drivetrain.

“Electric motors are used to store energy, and to propel the vehicle forward,” aan de Stegge explains. Electric motors can be far smaller than they currently are. The team decided to try and place this new type of engine in a new place: the wheel.  This meant a complete re-imagining of the wheel, more specifically the rim. What they came up with is a spoke-less wheel, which includes a motor to propel the car, as well as the brakes. “It offers several advantages: the car is lighter and the performance is better.” Though the technology is still relatively new, aan de Stegge is convinced that this technology will eventually replace the combustion engine, definitely bringing the car into the modern era.

TEDxDelft 2015-2016 | TEDxDelft Salon | Nima Tolou

Nima Tolou

Harvesting energy from the movement of humans to power our everyday appliances seems quite futuristic, maybe even implausible. Dr. Nima Tolou, Assistant Professor at the Department of Precision and Microsystems Engineering at TU Delft, focuses on creating a cleaner world by lowering the use of batteries and replacing them with energy driven by motion.

Tolou received his PhD in 2012 from the Department of Biomechanical Engineering at TU Delft, focussing on micro-electro-mechanical systems. Apart from being an Assistant Professor at TU Delft, he is also an Intra-European Fellow at the Optical and Semiconductor Group at Imperial College London. In addition, he has published several research papers and has been named inventor of eight patent applications, seven of which he is the first inventor.

“I am pretty excited to share my ideas on motion energy harvesters for real world applications,” he said. By 2020, 20 billion low-power devices will require batteries. During his talk Tolou will share his ideas about how energy recovered through motion will reduce our dependency on batteries, along with knowledge he gained through his work on the design of high-performance micro/meso compliant mechanisms for MEMS and motion-driven energy harvesters. Tolou hopes to reduce the environmental impact, replacement cost, and potential health risks from batteries through his revolutionary ideas.

Want to learn more about this new technology? Come be a part of this exciting talk on Sunday 24 January, starting at 15:00 at Theater de Veste.

TEDxDelft 2016 | TEDxDelft Salon | Bas aan de Stegge

Bas aan de Stegge

Electric cars are a great way to lower environmental emissions, and innovative ways to increase their efficiency are much needed to cater to a wider audience. Bas aan de Stegge, CEO and Team Manager of Formula Student Team Delft (DUT Racing), strives to achieve this by introducing the “spokeless drivetrain” which helps to develop an electric vehicle that is much lighter.

Aan de Stegge joined DUT Racing as a powertrain engineer when he was doing his Bachelor’s in Mechanical Engineering at TU Delft. There he helped to create an innovative powertrain for an electric race car. Later, he became a part of the Chief Recruitment Committee and was responsible for recruiting new engineers for the team. Today, Aan de Stegge is the Team Manager and Chief Executive Officer of DUT Racing and leads a team of eight full-time and 65 part-time students in the Formula Student Competition.

The focus of his talk stems from the new drivetrain DUT Racing has developed, designed specifically with weight reduction in mind. “We fundamentally looked at all the functions of a drivetrain and shaped it in a new way,” he explained. The new drivetrain integrates an electric motor and a transmission in a unique way inside the vehicle. This in turn makes the vehicle lighter and more efficient. For Aan de Stegge and his team, what matters most is to show the capabilities modern day technology has to offer. “It shows what kind of innovations are possible in electric vehicles,” he said.

Come and be inspired by this TEDx talk that will shed new light on how we will drive in the future. The Salon will take place on Sunday 24 January at 15:00, at Theater de Veste.

TEDxDelft 2016 | TEDxDelft Salon | Going places

 

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On Sunday 24 January at 15:00 TEDxDelft will host the next Salon at Theater de Veste, entitled Going Places. Continuing with the theme of climate change this Salon will focus on topics such as transport, energy recovery, and buildings.

The speakers for this event will be Bas aan de Stegge, team manager for the Formula Student Team Delft; Nima Tolou, Assistant Professor at TU Delft; and Robert Mulder, architect. Each will share interesting insights into new technologies and ways of thinking that can help against climate change.

The event will be held in English and admission is free. So tell your friends and family, and come join us for an afternoon of interesting talks and entertainment!

Special guests:

Bas aan de Stegge

 

Bas aan de Stegge

 

 

 

Nima Tolou

 

Nima Tolou

 

 

 

 

Robert Mulder

 

Robert Mulder

 

 

 

Special thanks to:

Logos_SalonPartner_StudiumGenerale

 Studium Generale

TU Delft

 

 

Theater de Veste Logo

 

Theater de Veste

 

 

Talbott International PresentationsTIP logo

 

 

 

LEX-LOGOLEX-Company

 

 

 

And Judith van de Nat, Joost Hoekstra and Hidde Harms for their participation in the organization in this event.